The Dark Side of Remanufacturing

Jun 23
2010

The Product Support process of remanufacturing can be employed for good…or for evil. Remanufacturing is a process that extends the economic life of a used-condition system by: growing its reliability, evolving its technology, assuring its design capability and improving the efficiency of Product Support processes employed.

Many firms acquire used systems and induct them into a remanufacturing process that delivers a product that has many of the attributes of a new system, but at 50% to 70% of the price; the customer wins and the entrepreneur wins by taking an “ugly duckling” and making an attractive profit from the make-over.

But there is one organization that can view remanufacturing unfavorably; OEMs who believe that the remanufactured product has “stolen” sales from their new-condition products. One approach an OEM could take is to begin a remanufacturing business and at least grab some of the used product market…but an “evil” approach would be to purchase as much used products as possible and then destroy the products so they could never be remanufactured…forcing customers to buy the OEM’s new-condition products.

One of America’s business leader icons, Thomas Watson, Sr., founder of IBM, used exactly this “evil” practice and was found guilty of anticompetitive practices. In 1903 Watson, working for National Cash Register (NCR) created a bogus firm to monopolize the used cash register business and systemically destroyed the machines, thus driving increased demand for new-condition cash registers.   

The above event and much more about Thomas Watson can be found in the book, “The Maverick and His Machine: Thomas Watson Sr., and the Making of IBM”.

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